Table olive processing methods

Here is a summary of methods for processing table olives:

METHOD PROCESSING METHODS VARIETIES
Treated Green Olives in Brine Olives are treated in alkaline lye and then packed into brine where they undergo a complete (Sevillian or Spanish-style) – or partial lactic fermentation.  In the latter, they may be subsequently preserved at a specified pH by sterilisation, pasteurisation, refrigeration, by the addition of preservatives or by inert gas (without brine)
  • Ascolana Tenera
  • Azapa
  • Gordal Sevillana
  • Hardy’s Mammoth
  • Hojiblanca
  • Manzanilla de Sevilla
  • Picholine
  • UC13A6
  • Verdale
Untreated Green Olives in Brine Greek or Sicilian – Olives are placed directly in 8-10% brine and are preserved by natural fermentation
  • Most Varieties
  • Barouni
  • Chalkidiki
  • Cucco
  • Hardy’s Mammoth
  • Konservolia
  • Oliva de Cerignola
  • Picholine
  • Verdale
Turning Colour Olives Treated in Brine Olives are treated in alkaline lye then preserved either by natural fermentation in brine, by heat treatment or by a combination of the two
  • Most Varieties
Untreated Turning Colour Olives in Brine ⁃ Olives are placed directly in 8-10% brine and are preserved by natural fermentation

⁃ Ligurian

  • Most Varieties
  • Taggiasca – wine red colour – firm flesh
Treated Black Olives in Brine Olives are treated in alkaline lye then preserved by natural fermentation through one or a combination of the following: in brine, by sterilisation or pasteurisation or by an addition of preservative.
  • Most Varieties
Treated Black Olives in Dry Salt Firm practically ripe olives are given a slight alkaline treatment, then preserved in alternating layers of olives and dry salt.
  • Most Varieties
Untreated Black Olives in Brine ⁃ Olives are placed directly in brine and are preserved by natural fermentation in brine alone, by sterilisation or pasteurisation, or by the addition of a preservative.

⁃ “Kalamata” Style – wine vinegar and olive oil added

  • Most Varieties
  • Hojiblanca
  • Kalamata
  • Konservolia
  • Leccino
  • Picholine
Untreated Black Olives in Dry Salt Fully ripe olives that have shrivelled on the tree are treated directly in brine
  • Kalamata
  • Oblonga
  • UC13A6
Untreated Pierced Black Olives in Dry Salt Fully ripe olives are pierced then preserved in alternating layers of dry salt or with a sprinkling of salt over them
  • Kalamata
  • Konservolia
Dehydrated Black Olives Ripe olives are blanched at 95℃ for 1-2 minutes & softened, partially dehydrated in salt than dried using gentle heat – sun or oven (50℃)
  • Majatica di Ferrandina
Olives Darkened by Oxidation Californian Style – Black ripe Turning Colour olives are debittered with alkali lye, darkened by oxidation, then packed in brine and preserved by heat sterilisation.
  • Californian Mission
  • Hojiblanca
  • Manzanilla de Sevilla
Bruised Olives Fresh olives or ones previously treated in brine (generally green-ripe) are deliberately bruised by hitting with a blunt object. Flavours and vinegar may be added.
  • Most Varieties
Split Olives These are green, Turning Colour black olives, split lengthwise by cutting into the skin and part of the flesh and then placed in brine with or without vinegar. Olive oil and aromatic substances may be added.
  • Barnea
  • Hojiblanca
  • Kalamata
  • Konservolia
Heat Cured Ripe olives are oven dried at 50℃ or air-dried until the bitterness is acceptable. The dried olives can be consumed without further treatment or in packed alternating layers of salt.
  • Kalamata
  • Oblonga
  • Pendolino
  • UC13A6
  • Volos
Black Olives in Olive Oil Heat cured or salt dried olives are packed with extra virgin olive oil
  • Numerous Varieties
Water cured ⁃ Italian Gaetano method

⁃ Traditional Ligurian – Benedictine style – Olives are washed and rinsed regularly for up to six weeks, then preserved in brine

  • Most Varieties
  • Taggiasca

More information about Table Olive Machinery

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